Episode-022

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Ep-022FatherFinch

Command Line Subnet Calculators – Much Easier than Adding
ipcalc (non-rel)
Important switches
-b removes all of the bianry output
-s n where n is the number of hosts you would like in a network

examples
all network information for address 192.168.100.12
ipcalc 192.168.100.12/26
same as
ipcalc 192.168.100.12 255.255.255.192
If I wanted to find the smallest network possible to have 88 hosts I can enter the following
ipcalc -s 88 10.30.0.0

ipcalc (rehl based)
Important switches
-b display brodcast address
-m display subnet mask
-p display prefix
-n display network

examples
display the subnet mask for the following cidr notation
ipcalc 192.168.100/28 -m
display the broadcast address, prefix, and network of the following address
ipcalc 172.16.20.122 255.255.252.0 -bpn

Honkey Magoo

OpenMediaVault
http://www.openmediavault.org/

Raspberry Pi Images
http://sourceforge.net/projects/openmediavault/files/Raspberry%20Pi%20images/

Virtual Images
http://sourceforge.net/projects/openmediavault/files/vm/

FiftyOneFifty

Photo project with Gimp
How to crop a photo in Gimp so it exactly matches the dimensions of the output media. I had some snapshots infamily albums I wanted to blow up for framing. If you are working fom a 3×5 snapshot, you will probably want to scan it a nearly the highest resolution your scanner is capable of, if the original media is allready 8×10, you will want to use a more manageable resolution like 800dpi.

If the original media has a different aspect ratio than the output media, say 8×10 (though I was using 8.5×11, because that’s size of my photo printer paper), you may want to crop the photo rather than leaving whitespace at the sides or on the top and bottom. Often, there is material at the edges of photos that can be left off and still make a god picture. If so, you can make your rectangular selection tool have the same aspect ratio as the target media by clicking on the selection tool in the Toolbox, then below under Tool Option, checking the tickbox for “Fixed”, select “Aspect Ratio” from the dropdrown, and then filling in the aspect ratio. For 8.5×11 photographic printer paper, you would use 8.5:11 for portrait or 11:8.5 for landscape.

You with have to position the selection tool by grabbing the corners. Once you have placed it where only unimportant parts of the picture are outside the selection area, go to the Edit menu and select “Copy”, then select “paste as new image”. Now, select “Print” from the file menu. Select the appropriate Orientation from the “Page Setup” tab. Next, on the “Image Settings” tab, uncheck “Ignore Margins” and decrease either the X or the Y resolution (as long as you leave them chained) until the image fills the Preview. On the other hand, if you are printing an 8×10 photo on 8.5×11 paper, set your margins appropriately.