Episode-005

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My ShownotesKwisher discusses swapping a motherboard on a working system

Installed O/S Xubuntu 13.04 64-bit
• Old system was a Dell Inspiron 531s
• AMD Athlon(tm) 64 X2 Dual Core Processor 4400+ 2.2 GHz 65 W
http://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=AMD+Athlon+64+X2+Dual+Core+4400%2B
• 3gb RAM
• Samba file server
• NFS file server
• MythTV backend
• Virtualbox – etherpad lite

• New system is a BIOSTAR TA890GXB HD
• AMD Phenom(tm) II X4 810 2.6 GHz 95 W
http://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=AMD+Phenom+II+X4+810
• 8gb RAM

References:
fstab file – https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/fstab
blkid command – http://linux.die.net/man/8/blkid
grub repair boot disk – https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair

HonkeyMagoo talks about his expeience at NELF 2014

•Held at the Residence Inn Marriot Hotel in Cambridge, MA
•Got there early and talked for a while with a guy who works in IT for a school system in VT. He converted all his middle school kids to Ubuntu.
•Got to meet Tracy Holtz, Russ Wenner, Martin Obando, Pokey, Flying Rich, Door, Jonathan, and Bruce. I also got to talk to a person by the name of Will Weaver. He gave a talk on docker that I am sorry that I missed. Docker seems very interstinig and hope to try it out soon. I missed his talk but all of the talks are posted on http://northeastlinuxfest.org/.

The talks I saw were:

• Jon “Mad Dog” Hall: My twenty years in Linux
• Chad Wollenburg: Open Source in Education
• Paul Asadoorian: The 10 Commandments of Embedded Device Security
• Tracy Holtz: Open Source in Small Businesses
• Door to Door Geek: Recording Professional Podcasts in Open Source
• Ask the Geek: A Panel Discussion Moderated by Russ Wenner

Fiftonefifty discusses the utility byobu

byobu – A wrapper for screen and tmux
•Usage byobu-tmux [tmux options] , byobu-screen [screen options] , just byobu defailts to tmux
•The Caption line shows your open windows, and highlights the one upon which you are focused, and optionally displays your user name, host name, IP address, and a hint that there is a Menu available if you press F9.
•The Hard Status line consists of color coded output and symbols with configurable and dynamically updated facts, statistics, and information about the local system.
STATUS NOTIFICATIONS are fully documented in the linked reference

Key Bindings that I find moste useful
F2 Create a new window
F3 Move to the previous window
F4 Move to the next window
F5 Refresh all status notifications
F6 Detach from the session and logout
Shift-F6 Detach from the session, but do not logout

References:
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Byobu

Episode-004

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chattr: xy problems: when someone says they’re having trouble downloading and compiling glibc, see if it’s an xy problem.
  • User wants to do X.
  • User doesn’t know how to do X, but thinks they can fumble their way to a solution if they can just manage to do Y.
  • User doesn’t know how to do Y either.
  • User asks for help with Y.
  • Others try to help user with Y, but are confused because Y seems like a strange problem to want to solve.
  • After much interaction and wasted time, it finally becomes clear that the user really wants help with X, and that Y wasn’t even a suitable solution for X.
chattr: a user asks in irc: ‘anybody experienced in enabling posix shared memory in mint 13 ? … I have added the fstab line and mounted … but returns none and tmpfs returns both ?’ This question got me to thinking about the difference between what the mount command outputs and what’s in /etc/fstab. Poking around search results lead me to the kernel source code documentation and the Linux from Scratch book: 7.4. Device and Module Handling on an LFS System [udev] (and maybe 7.5. Creating Custom Symlinks to Devices )
Honkeymagoo: Raspberry Pi Server
I had installed too much crap on my regular server (Owncloud, Elgg, WordPress, Plex etc.) and thought it was time to wipe it and start over. I figured in the mean time I would try and use one of my Raspberry Pis as a file sharing server. I had talked to serveral people about using Owncloud on the Raspberry Pi using Nginx as opposed to Apache so I shut down my server and started this project.
  • started with a minimal Raspbian based distro called MinibianMinibian is basically Raspbian without X and ssh already set up.
  • Next I installed Samba for file sharing (2 quick hints always always always make a back up of your smb.conf file before doing anything. Second pay attention to file permissions. Things like chmod and chown are your friends. Also if anyone can give a good explanation of the difference between chmod and chown I would like to hear it. I know there is a difference I’m just not sure what exactly it is.
  • Next I WAS going to install Owncloud with Nginx but Kwisher told me about a little program called Seafile. Seafile is a web based file sharing program.
  • Some quick thoughts about Seafile. It runs real smooth. Better than Owncloud did on my old server. I don’t like the fact that files that are uploaded to the server are not saved in a way that would make them easily accessible to the server admin. I think they are encrypted on the server side. I want to play with it more because they have a command line client for linux and I want to try syncing files and see if that might solve my problem of not having the files accessible on the server.
  • Next I had heard about a web based email client called Roundcube. I first heard about this program on a podcast called SourceTrunk, a great podcast where the host reviews and tests out open source software (episode 096, released 2014-01-30). I thought I could benefit from a web based email client because I had a desire to run an email client but I am not always able to be at my computer, though I can sometimes get internet access. So I thought this might be fun to try out.
  • Roundcube is in the raspbian repos so I tried just a straight apt-get install roundcube. It stalled out midway through because it saw sqlite. so I had to install the rest by apt-get install mysql. Then I had to download the latest package of roundcube off there site and compile it.
fiftyonefifty: Automatically Launch Applications in Linux
  • Of course, the traditional way is to put it in /etc/rc.local (note, in some distros you might have to make rc.local executable).  But this won’t work for a application that needs to run under X, like a mixer.
  • Most desktops have their own way of autolaunching apps, but if you move between desktops, you may want to configure autostart only once.
  • Find the dot desktop file for the application. (Most applications that appear in you menus will have a .desktop file in /usr/share/applications/. I found kmix.desktop in /usr/share/applications/kde4/).
  • Copy it to ~/.config/autostart/ or /etc/xdg/autostart (depending on the values in $XDG_CONFIG_HOME and $XDG_CONFIG_DIRS).
  • Use chmod to make it executable.
  • Solution: We solved this during the show.  Apparently, there is not good autostart for every desktop, because desktop apps should load after the window manager.  For lxde, autostart is /etc/xdg/lxsession/LXDE/autostart